seattle

//Tag:seattle

Postcards from a Freegan Raccoon

By | 2017-09-24T00:49:35+00:00 May 20th, 2014|Blog, Mammals, Pacific Northwest, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

I love seeing raccoons in daylight, just to observe the behaviors which normally evade us at night. Contrary to popular mythology, seeing a raccoon in the daytime does not mean they are rabid. Raccoons can carry rabies, but animals with rabies exhibit other symptoms. This time of year, we see raccoons even more often in the afternoons as they forage, often to support a growing family of kits. Mother raccoons will look after their young for a year or so.

North American Beaver … Eating Lily Pads Like Enchiladas

By | 2017-09-24T00:47:51+00:00 May 13th, 2014|Blog, Mammals, Pacific Northwest, Wildlife|

Beavers are vegetarians, and lily tubers are a favorite foodstuff. Because beavers are crepuscular (loving the twilight), you'll see them most often at dawn and dusk, which accounts for the predictable in-time of this beaver family.

Living in Your Own Private Cryosphere

By | 2017-09-24T01:24:18+00:00 December 12th, 2013|Art-Ness, Blog, Pacific Northwest, Photography, Popular, Seattle +, Weather|

Water is always in flux, mutable — liquid, vaporous, frozen — evaporating, condensing and expanding. This fluidity of form and purpose fuels life with its hydrological rhythms. I find my own personal cryosphere on a 23-degree day in Seattle. Instead of water bears, though, in this ice I see the planetary and the galactic  ...

Welcome Home, Seattle Ducks!

By | 2017-09-24T01:35:38+00:00 November 15th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Ducks, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

I spotted my first migratory ducks on the urban shores of Elliott Bay last week. The new arrivals are on edge -- wary and easy to flush. Lifting my lens is enough to send them skittering to the middle of the bay, and I can only imagine what sights and sounds have jarred them into high alert on their long journey home.

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Saved by the Wildlife of Smith Cove

By | 2017-09-24T01:50:33+00:00 August 7th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Ducks, Geese and Swans, Marine Mammals, Ospreys, Pacific Northwest, Raptors, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Smith Cove Park is populated only occasionally with dog walkers, cruise ship aficionados, marina boaters and a few transient souls who stop there by way of a nearby bike route. I went there for the waters -- and for the salt air  -- without expectation of wildlife. But, that was about to change -- one late April day.

Gull Chicks and Gateway Birds

By | 2017-09-24T01:53:59+00:00 August 1st, 2013|Animal Behavior, Baby Animals, Bird Species, Blog, Gulls & Terns, Nesting, Pacific Northwest, Popular, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Like Georgia O’Keeffe’s flower, the gull, along with many urban birds, is overlooked and pushed aside, sometimes literally under foot on crowded sidewalks. Also like O’Keeffe’s flower, when you take the time to really look at that gull and embrace the wholeness of her — her yellow bill, her gray coverts, her ear spots or orbital rings, the white tips of her stretched wings — she becomes your world not just for the moment, but in perpetuity.

Truth and Ambivalence in Photography

By | 2017-09-24T01:58:25+00:00 July 9th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Herons and Egrets, Pacific Northwest, Sea Scale Snail, Seattle +, Wildlife Ethics|

As a volunteer in a wildlife hospital, the training involves detachment — because you will let go. Whether it is through the rehabilitation and subsequent release of the animal, or through that animal’s death, the relationship ends, as it should, when the animal is freed to his or her rightful destiny. Everything from objective language to silent, limited interaction with the patients is part of that process.

Faces of the 18th Weir

By | 2017-09-24T01:59:55+00:00 July 1st, 2013|Blog, Pacific Northwest, Sea Scale Snail, Seattle +|

They sit suspended at the 18th weir, these scaled faces in the sockeye crowd. It's the window to their water world, the portal from ocean to stream to lake, where their gills remember the taste of fresh after years in the salty sea -- and where they lead -- at least in part -- by magnetic memories of the gravel beds where they were born.

Clever, Corrugated Starlings

By | 2017-09-24T02:02:29+00:00 June 20th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Nesting, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Starlings are common residents in my city landscape. In appearance they are kaleidoscopic, polychromatic, iridescent, resplendent. In song, they are whistles, chants, murmurs and twitters. Every spring, they find ways to reconfigure urban structures into sanctuaries for their nests -- structures like this corrugated metal framework.