Low Tide Life

//Low Tide Life

Low Tide Life

“When we contemplate the whole globe as one great dewdrop, striped and dotted with continents and islands, flying through space with other stars all singing and shining together as one, the whole universe appears as an infinite storm of beauty.” ~ John Muir

Low Tide - ©ingridtaylar

Crow Foraging at Low Tide - ©ingridtaylar


Surf Scoter Foraging

Surf Scoter Foraging at a Mussel Bed - ©ingridtaylar

Sea Star at Low Tide

Sea Star Overturned by Gulls - ©ingridtaylar

Gull Foraging at Low Tide - ©ingridtaylar

Gull Chase

Gull Chase - ©ingridtaylar

Goldeneye Diving for Food - ©ingridtaylar

Goldeneye Ducks Underwater

Diving Duo Goldeneyes - ©ingridtaylar

Goldeneye Catch - ©ingridtaylar

Goldeneye with Catch - ©ingridtaylar

By | 2012-02-15T00:30:26+00:00 February 15th, 2012|Bird Species, Blog, Ducks, Gulls & Terns, Pacific Northwest, Parks, Seattle +|3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Mia McPherson February 15, 2012 at 4:07 am

    Ingrid,

    The behavior shown in your Scoter images is fascinating to me because I don’t get to see that where I live. Wonderful action images and I especially like the starfish and its beautiful reflection. Nice low angle on the crow and gull!

    • ingrid February 17, 2012 at 11:00 pm

      Mia, thank you. This is the first time I’ve seen a scoter foraging above the water line. The tide was so low, fresh mussels were easily exposed. I really wish I could get an eye-level perspective, because I’ve found they like this area around the pier and I’m likely to see them there. But the only vantage point for photos is from the railing above — unless I get in a wetsuit which would really freak them out.

      They’re not too disturbed by humans in general, which is unusual for scoters. But I think it’s because they feed at this marina whenever the tide is low, during their wintering months here. I noticed it’s the man-powered boats that really spook them: canoes, kayaks. They’ll take off en masse and often won’t return that day, if such a boat comes around. I’m supposing it’s because being diving ducks, they’re often hunted from sculls. But I can’t say for sure that’s why.

  2. Bea Elliott February 15, 2012 at 5:51 am

    Beautiful quote by John Muir – So appropriate for such stunning images. Thank you!

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