Seattle +

//Seattle +

Living in Your Own Private Cryosphere

By | 2017-09-24T01:24:18+00:00 December 12th, 2013|Art-Ness, Blog, Pacific Northwest, Photography, Popular, Seattle +, Weather|

Water is always in flux, mutable — liquid, vaporous, frozen — evaporating, condensing and expanding. This fluidity of form and purpose fuels life with its hydrological rhythms. I find my own personal cryosphere on a 23-degree day in Seattle. Instead of water bears, though, in this ice I see the planetary and the galactic  ...

Welcome Home, Seattle Ducks!

By | 2017-09-24T01:35:38+00:00 November 15th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Ducks, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

I spotted my first migratory ducks on the urban shores of Elliott Bay last week. The new arrivals are on edge -- wary and easy to flush. Lifting my lens is enough to send them skittering to the middle of the bay, and I can only imagine what sights and sounds have jarred them into high alert on their long journey home.

Comments Off on Welcome Home, Seattle Ducks!

Saved by the Wildlife of Smith Cove

By | 2017-09-24T01:50:33+00:00 August 7th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Ducks, Geese and Swans, Marine Mammals, Ospreys, Pacific Northwest, Raptors, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Smith Cove Park is populated only occasionally with dog walkers, cruise ship aficionados, marina boaters and a few transient souls who stop there by way of a nearby bike route. I went there for the waters -- and for the salt air  -- without expectation of wildlife. But, that was about to change -- one late April day.

Gull Chicks and Gateway Birds

By | 2017-12-11T04:11:29+00:00 August 1st, 2013|@ITBlog, Animal Behavior, Baby Animals, Bird Species, Blog, Gulls & Terns, Nesting, Pacific Northwest, Popular, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Like Georgia O’Keeffe’s flower, the gull, along with many urban birds, is overlooked and pushed aside, sometimes literally under foot on crowded sidewalks. Also like O’Keeffe’s flower, when you take the time to really look at that gull and embrace the wholeness of her — her yellow bill, her gray coverts, her ear spots or orbital rings, the white tips of her stretched wings — she becomes your world not just for the moment, but in perpetuity.

Faces of the 18th Weir

By | 2017-09-24T01:59:55+00:00 July 1st, 2013|Blog, Pacific Northwest, Sea Scale Snail, Seattle +|

They sit suspended at the 18th weir, these scaled faces in the sockeye crowd. It's the window to their water world, the portal from ocean to stream to lake, where their gills remember the taste of fresh after years in the salty sea -- and where they lead -- at least in part -- by magnetic memories of the gravel beds where they were born.

Clever, Corrugated Starlings

By | 2017-09-24T02:02:29+00:00 June 20th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Nesting, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Starlings are common residents in my city landscape. In appearance they are kaleidoscopic, polychromatic, iridescent, resplendent. In song, they are whistles, chants, murmurs and twitters. Every spring, they find ways to reconfigure urban structures into sanctuaries for their nests -- structures like this corrugated metal framework.

Sleeping With the Fishes

By | 2017-09-24T02:04:11+00:00 June 16th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Ospreys, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

This isn't the first time I've seen an Osprey napping with a fish in his talons. Last year, while observing the platform way across Seattle's long-abused-but-recovering Duwamish River I watched a male Osprey land on a utility pole, clutching a half-eaten meal. A crow who'd been tailing the Osprey, landed alongside. The Osprey perched, adjusted -- then appeared to doze off.

Please Brake for Birds

By | 2017-09-24T18:08:37+00:00 June 8th, 2013|Baby Animals, Bird Species, Blog, Crows, Jays & Corvids, Geese and Swans, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +, Wildlife Ethics|

It seems like common sense ... to slow or stop the car if you see an animal on the road. But, in recent weeks, I've had several incidents where birds were clearly in harm's way and people refused to either stop or take even 30 seconds off their commute to let an animal exit the roadway.

Great Blue Resilience

By | 2017-09-24T02:18:47+00:00 June 6th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Featured, Herons and Egrets, Nesting, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

During the week after I first documented the branch-bearing herons, I returned to the park to watch the avian house builders again. I posted to my Facebook page that I stood for an hour that first day, mesmerized by this testament to renewal. In the end, there were 40+ new nests and trees full of heron chatter.