Other Birds

//Other Birds

Clever, Corrugated Starlings

By | 2017-09-24T02:02:29+00:00 June 20th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Nesting, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Starlings are common residents in my city landscape. In appearance they are kaleidoscopic, polychromatic, iridescent, resplendent. In song, they are whistles, chants, murmurs and twitters. Every spring, they find ways to reconfigure urban structures into sanctuaries for their nests -- structures like this corrugated metal framework.

The Kingfisher Wasn’t Born to Think About It

By | 2017-09-24T02:28:35+00:00 March 27th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

The kingfisher rises out of the black wave like a blue flower, in his beak he carries a silver leaf. I think this is the prettiest world -- so long as you don't mind a little dying, how could there be a day in your whole life that doesn't have its splash of happiness?

The Red-Winged Way

By | 2017-09-24T18:16:22+00:00 March 1st, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Nesting, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

I notice spring birds before spring buds ... and just the other day, the Red-winged Blackbirds were vocalizing their intent over a Kirkland swamp. In my periphery I saw the crimson flashes of male birds flitting between reeds, and then females clinging to cattail puffs.

The Thing with Feathers: Robins Eating Berries

By | 2017-09-24T19:44:31+00:00 January 19th, 2013|Birds, Blog, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

The main diet for wintering robins is fruit-based. Berries like pyracantha, hawthorn, holly, and juniper meet digestive juices in the stomach's proventriculus at the front end, then transport their seeds through the bird's system for deposit and germination later.

[Northern] Flickering

By | 2017-09-27T17:14:35+00:00 January 15th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

I believe this interaction was a territorial display between two Northern Flickers. Their routine was on a continuous loop for about five minutes, performed on utility cables strung across our view of the city.