Featured

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Featured and favorite blog posts

“Proof of Life” Photography – Part 1

By | 2017-12-09T01:03:02+00:00 December 27th, 2013|@ITBlog, Art-Ness, Bird Species, Blog, Featured, Pacific Northwest, Photography, Raptors|

In the Northwest, you're working with multiple environmental factors when making wildlife pictures. From a technical standpoint, the most dramatic adaptation in this gorgeous green zone is light -- both quality and quantity of light. You're always playing the odds with rain, clouds, diffusion, and time.

Going All Micro Four Thirds on Wildlife

By | 2017-12-09T01:03:25+00:00 October 1st, 2013|@ITBlog, Art-Ness, Blog, Featured, Photography|

I get many emails and comments related to this post -- from people interested in micro four thirds (m43) and mirrorless cameras as a wildlife format. I've been shooting with Olympus m43 gear exclusively now for three years and plan to update my impressions before the end of the year.

The Magical Mystery Tour of Tent Caterpillars

By | 2017-12-09T01:03:46+00:00 July 14th, 2013|@ITBlog, Blog, Bug Nation, Featured, Pacific Northwest|

This spring we had what's called an "outbreak" of tent caterpillars in Seattle -- Malacosoma californicum -- a cyclical occurrence of every six to ten years where these white, diaphanous tents drape across branches of alder, apple, ash, birch, cherry, cottonwood, willow, fruit trees, and roses. The tents are shelter, shade, and molting sites for the vivid larvae inside. The caterpillars venture out in the day to feed on foliage, then return each night to hunker down in their fortress. The black speckles are frass, or caterpillar waste which accumulates in their temporary home.

Great Blue Resilience

By | 2017-09-24T02:18:47+00:00 June 6th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Featured, Herons and Egrets, Nesting, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

During the week after I first documented the branch-bearing herons, I returned to the park to watch the avian house builders again. I posted to my Facebook page that I stood for an hour that first day, mesmerized by this testament to renewal. In the end, there were 40+ new nests and trees full of heron chatter.

Birds Flying High … You Know How I Feel

By | 2017-09-24T02:21:46+00:00 April 29th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Featured, Pacific Northwest, Shorebirds|

When thousands of shorebirds frolic on the mire, their wingbeats rattle like seashells strung in the wind ... just the lightest of chimes, near silent except for the rush of air over 15,000 pairs of wings. They become a coil, spiraling sometimes at 40 miles per hour into shape shifters, turning their plumage from dark to light to flashing white to confuse the hunting Peregrines.

Post Processing, Realism + Conceptualism: A Postscript

By | 2017-12-06T22:19:40+00:00 February 24th, 2013|Art-Ness, Bird Species, Blog, Featured, Pacific Northwest, Photography, Shorebirds, Wildlife Ethics|

I heard a lecture recently where Picasso's view of photography was described this way: For Picasso, "photography was never an exact registration of a scene, but it was a creative device.” (Arthur I. Miller). The lecture was about conceptualism and perceptualism in both art and science, using Picasso and Einstein as subjects. Picasso's view of the camera is obviously liberated by the fact that he was using it as a fine art tool, not a photojournalistic one.

Rafts of Dreaming Birds

By | 2017-12-11T04:12:07+00:00 February 4th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Birds, Blog, Ducks, Featured, Pacific Northwest|

I wondered if they were, as Jung suggested about human dream states, creating psychic wholeness by connecting their conscious and unconscious realms. Externally, for us, there’s serenity in birds flocked together for slumber … Canvasbacks revealing just one wary red eye, Ruddy Ducks spinning with their sail of a tail, Scaup males waking before the rest and rustling the females to breakfast and mollusks. They utter the lightest peeps in their own language as their unconscious dream life meets life’s surface tension.