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The Magical Mystery Tour of Tent Caterpillars

By | 2017-12-09T01:03:46+00:00 July 14th, 2013|@ITBlog, Blog, Bug Nation, Featured, Pacific Northwest|

This spring we had what's called an "outbreak" of tent caterpillars in Seattle -- Malacosoma californicum -- a cyclical occurrence of every six to ten years where these white, diaphanous tents drape across branches of alder, apple, ash, birch, cherry, cottonwood, willow, fruit trees, and roses. The tents are shelter, shade, and molting sites for the vivid larvae inside. The caterpillars venture out in the day to feed on foliage, then return each night to hunker down in their fortress. The black speckles are frass, or caterpillar waste which accumulates in their temporary home.

Faces of the 18th Weir

By | 2017-09-24T01:59:55+00:00 July 1st, 2013|Blog, Pacific Northwest, Sea Scale Snail, Seattle +|

They sit suspended at the 18th weir, these scaled faces in the sockeye crowd. It's the window to their water world, the portal from ocean to stream to lake, where their gills remember the taste of fresh after years in the salty sea -- and where they lead -- at least in part -- by magnetic memories of the gravel beds where they were born.

Clever, Corrugated Starlings

By | 2017-09-24T02:02:29+00:00 June 20th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Nesting, Other Birds, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +, Urban Wildlife & Nature|

Starlings are common residents in my city landscape. In appearance they are kaleidoscopic, polychromatic, iridescent, resplendent. In song, they are whistles, chants, murmurs and twitters. Every spring, they find ways to reconfigure urban structures into sanctuaries for their nests -- structures like this corrugated metal framework.

Sleeping With the Fishes

By | 2017-09-24T02:04:11+00:00 June 16th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Ospreys, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

This isn't the first time I've seen an Osprey napping with a fish in his talons. Last year, while observing the platform way across Seattle's long-abused-but-recovering Duwamish River I watched a male Osprey land on a utility pole, clutching a half-eaten meal. A crow who'd been tailing the Osprey, landed alongside. The Osprey perched, adjusted -- then appeared to doze off.

In Their Own Words … Protecting Gray Wolves From Their Haters

By | 2017-09-24T02:04:45+00:00 June 13th, 2013|Blog, Endangered Species|

One way to illustrate what’s at stake in removing protections from gray wolves, is to quote the people who’ve effectively been given legal license to kill them. I will not link out to their websites or Facebook fan pages (some of which have thousands of fans — one has more than 18,000), but I can assure you this rhetoric is frequently accompanied by gruesome imagery of dead wolves. I’ve posted just a smattering of their words, from a much larger supply, at the end of this post. [Crudeness warning.]

A Pelagic Housewarming Gift

By | 2017-09-24T02:06:31+00:00 June 9th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Cormorants, Nesting, Pacific Northwest|

The flight path started at distant patches of seaweed which passing cormorants would pick off the water and carry back to their nesting towers. In the image below, a Pelagic Cormorant with characteristic white flanks, handed off a seaweed prize to his lady love. Since both male and female incubate, I'm not 100 percent sure of the sexes here, but the gift bringer did seem the larger of the two, which would suggest a male.

Please Brake for Birds

By | 2017-09-24T18:08:37+00:00 June 8th, 2013|Baby Animals, Bird Species, Blog, Crows, Jays & Corvids, Geese and Swans, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +, Wildlife Ethics|

It seems like common sense ... to slow or stop the car if you see an animal on the road. But, in recent weeks, I've had several incidents where birds were clearly in harm's way and people refused to either stop or take even 30 seconds off their commute to let an animal exit the roadway.

Great Blue Resilience

By | 2017-09-24T02:18:47+00:00 June 6th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Featured, Herons and Egrets, Nesting, Pacific Northwest, Seattle +|

During the week after I first documented the branch-bearing herons, I returned to the park to watch the avian house builders again. I posted to my Facebook page that I stood for an hour that first day, mesmerized by this testament to renewal. In the end, there were 40+ new nests and trees full of heron chatter.

The Sandpiper Trail at Grays Harbor NWR

By | 2017-09-24T02:20:24+00:00 May 28th, 2013|Animal Behavior, Bird Species, Blog, Migration, Pacific Northwest, Parks|

For a few weeks at the end of April and beginning of May, hundreds of thousands of migrating sandpipers, Dunlins, plovers, dowitchers and Red Knots feed and rest on the Refuge's mud flats and along the tideline. On the day we went, a volunteer estimated 15,000 birds were foraging on the plateau in front of us.

Birds Flying High … You Know How I Feel

By | 2017-09-24T02:21:46+00:00 April 29th, 2013|Bird Species, Blog, Featured, Pacific Northwest, Shorebirds|

When thousands of shorebirds frolic on the mire, their wingbeats rattle like seashells strung in the wind ... just the lightest of chimes, near silent except for the rush of air over 15,000 pairs of wings. They become a coil, spiraling sometimes at 40 miles per hour into shape shifters, turning their plumage from dark to light to flashing white to confuse the hunting Peregrines.